Wenny Hidayat

Sometime mid-2021 DigIO reopened its traineeship program after a period of COVID hiatus, opening a new chapter on our Sydney branch with its first cohort of trainees. Between brainstorming for ideas during and in the aftercare, I reflected about how mentorship can be done better, how tech can be made welcoming, and in extension, how to teach and learn better.

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Usually people start off idealistic right out of school, then they become jaded or get street smart, understand nuance, and make concessions in different degrees, like what you just described.

In my case I agree with picking only important battles, and cutting losses was something I had to learn the hard way, too. Life is just too short to die on every small hill.

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A pursuit of consistency.

(This was an essay I wrote back in 2018, in a now-defunct personal blog as an attempt to understand containerisation, reposted for posterity.)

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To see the mentor side, refer to previous post: Context Generation.

Having been born more than yesterday, I found that hire-ability boils down to 3 things: experience, connections, and attitude. This implicit schema is as obvious as breathing. Where the gap is, in a lot of cases, are the specific steps: how to get experience when one needs experience to get experience, how to be minded to when one is a nobody, and most relevant-ly, what kind of person is seen as having the potential to do software development?

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Do not rely only on reputation, fancy badges and bold statements on the website, or contractual obligation.

Guilty as charged, haha! Thanks for the UpGuard link - need that.

I assume OneTrust is doing that in an automated way, but as you said, who assesses the assessor - and how do they assess? Maybe you could do a deep dive article on this security assessment automation, what its limitations are, what parts can be automated and which ones require human touch, and the kicker - will Least Privileged be the default instead of just recommended best practice?

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There is a certain archetype in tech where the ideal techie is the one that has opinions, and is always right. It has brought many great bounties to the practitioners, thus the practice proliferated, like a blight threatening the roots of civility.

These days it’s tech; it is easily the case anywhere for anything high stake and lucrative. Where visibility is rewarded, she who shouts the loudest, wins.

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